Charlotte Fortin

Charlotte Fortin

Charlotte was a young high school graduate who followed in her father’s and grandfather’s entrepreneurial footsteps when she decided to open up her own business, Wound Up.3

 

Inspired by some small and eclectic boutiques in California, Wound Up was opened to be a women’s clothing store targeting women between the ages of 18 to 40.

The store’s merchandise includes blouses, shorts, skirts, and dresses. Fortin says that starting a business pushed her to grow up and become much more responsible and conscious.

TIP:  Failure and the fear of failure should not be the end of your entrepreneurial journey. Rather, allow failure to motivate you and use it as a catalyst to refine your strategy.

 

Caine Monroy

Caine Monroy

Caine Monroy was only nine years old when he launched his own makeshift cardboard arcade inside his father’s East L.A. auto parts store.4 The arcade’s only customer—doting on Caine’s genius ability to create something from nothing—decided to generate buzz with the hopes of raising college fund money for Caine. He posted a short film to social media, and soon, Caine’s Arcade business became internationally known, reported on news outlets such as ABC World News, Good Morning America, and MSNBC.

The movement generated more customers than what the auto parts store could handle, with patrons waiting for four hours or more.5 It is unknown how much Caine’s Arcade earned, but the scholarship fund collected more than $200,000. Caine’s Arcade birthed a movement, which led to the creation of the Imagination Foundation, a non-profit organization designed to encourage creativity and entrepreneurship among children. Most importantly, Caine’s Arcade ignited an innovative spirit within kids around the world.

 

Read More: https://www.investopedia.com/10-successful-young-entrepreneurs-4773310

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